What Does The Term Dressed To The Nines Mean?

Where did the term dressed to the nines come from?

One theory is that it comes from the name of the 99th Wiltshire Regiment, known as the Nines, which was renowned for its smart appearance..

How do you use dressed to the nines in a sentence?

Jackie went out dressed to the nines.Now, remember the elegant woman, always dressed to the nines, with the infectious laugh.The girl is always dressed to the nines.Last year at her party, everyone was dressed to the nines.The whole family were dressed to the nines when they left for the wedding.More items…•

Why do we say for Pete’s sake?

“For Pete’s sake” originated as a substitute for “for Christ’s sake,” and other similar expressions. According to the Oxford English Dictionary, “for Pete’s sake” came into use more than a century ago and prompted similar sayings such as “for the love of Pete” in 1906 and “in the name of Pete” in 1942.

What does Heavens to Betsy mean?

Q From Mark Lord: I am looking for the origin and meaning of the phrase Heavens to Betsy. A The meaning is simple enough: it’s a mild American exclamation of shock or surprise. It’s dated, only rarely encountered in print and then most often as an evocation of times past.

Can’t cut the mustard meaning?

When you use the expression ‘Can’t Cut the Mustard’ you mean that someone is unable to succeed or meet expectations. Example of use: “I really like Jake, but he just can’t cut the mustard.”

Where did the saying for crying out loud originate?

For crying out loud” is said to originate from the expression “for Christ’s sake.” How you get from “for Christ’s sake” to “for crying out loud” I don’t know, but I bet it has something to do with a father who was displeased with the incessant crying of his sprout. … And with that, the expression was coined.

What does being at sixes and sevens mean?

“At sixes and sevens” is an English idiom used to describe a condition of confusion or disarray.

What does Bob’s your uncle Fanny’s your aunt mean?

My Aunt Fanny! There would appear to be an inconsistency in the expression “Bob’s your uncle and Fanny’s your aunt” if the above two meanings are applied, the first phrase meaning everything is fine, settled; the second that it is unbelievable, untrue.

What does Bob’s your uncle mean?

“Bob’s your uncle” is a phrase commonly used in Ireland, United Kingdom and Commonwealth countries that means “and there it is” or “and there you have it”. Typically, someone says it to conclude a set of simple instructions or when a result is reached.

Why do we say Bob’s your uncle?

In 1887, British Prime Minister Robert Gascoyne-Cecil appointed his nephew Arthur James Balfour as Minister for Ireland. The phrase ‘Bob’s your uncle’ was coined when Arthur referred to the Prime Minister as ‘Uncle Bob’. Apparently, it’s very simple to become a minister when Bob’s your uncle!

What is Kit and Kaboodle mean?

Everything entirely, the whole lotNoun. kit and caboodle. (US, Canada, Australia, idiomatic) Everything entirely, the whole lot.